Author Topic: Derek Prince Ministry  (Read 44244 times)

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November 30, 2019, 07:08:10 AM
Reply #1720
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November 30, Considering Jesus First

 
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Let us consider one another.

This eighth “Let us” passage says, in the original Greek, “Let us consider one another.” (See Hebrews 10:24.) But I would like to look back to Hebrews 3:1, where the same word, “consider,” is used. It reads, “Consider the Apostle and High Priest of our confession, Christ Jesus.” If we consider Jesus, we will end up considering one another. But it is important that we do it in that order. We consider Jesus first; then, we consider one another. It makes a great deal of difference whether I relate to you as just a person or as a person in Christ.

My mind goes back to an incident that happened while I was the principal of a college that trained teachers in East Africa. For every vacancy that allowed us to accept one student, there were at least ten suitable applicants. One girl actually walked twenty-four miles barefoot just to get an interview. You can hardly conceive the desperate hunger people in Africa had for getting an education. Education was the key to success in life, as they saw it.

One day, an elderly mother came to me on behalf of her son, a prospective student. He was not exactly suitable for the school, however, and we had not accepted him. His mother was pestering me to the point that I was growing annoyed with her. In Africa, they do not believe in democracy; they believe in the chief, the strong man. He is the one who matters. This woman kept telling me, “You are the great one; what you say goes.” I got so irritated that I was about to give her a piece of my mind—and it was not my sanctified mind, either! That is when the Lord spoke to me, very gently, saying, Remember, she’s one of My children. Be careful how you treat her. I repented. She really was a dear, precious woman, and a child of God. If we consider Jesus first, it will make all the difference in how we consider one another.

Thank You, Lord, that You help me to love others. I proclaim that I consider Jesus first, allowing this perspective to affect how I consider others. I shall consider others. Amen.



December 01, 2019, 04:42:27 AM
Reply #1721
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December 01, Provocation—The Right Kind

 https://cdn.subsplash.com/audios/9S2SS4/128386c0-cda6-4153-b9fa-b5e6b7eee919/audio.mp3

 
Let us consider one another.

The King James Version of Hebrews 10:24 reads, “And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works.” This version uses the word provoke, a strong word that typically has a negative connotation. I think it was used deliberately in order to make us think. What do we usually provoke from other people? Anger or jealousy. But we are to provoke to “love and to good works.”

The Greek word translated “provoke” is the same word from which the English word paroxysm is derived. Do you know what a paroxysm is? It is an absolutely uncontrollable outburst of emotion, such as anger, or even laughter.

Although the word provoke often suggests something bad, in this context, it is turned to the good, for we are to provoke one another to love and good works. And let me just point out that there are certain people whom you’ll have to provoke if you want them to do the right thing. Moreover, you will have to consider how to provoke them.

This is one of my weaknesses. I don’t like having to consider people’s personalities. With a military background and a rather logical mind, it is sufficient for me just to tell the person to do something. But the Bible tells us to consider how to tell them, because if you want the right result from one person, you have to tell him in quite a different way from the way in which you might tell another person. Anybody who has children knows this is true—you cannot treat them all the same. You can scold one child and get the right result. But if you scold another child, you might just discourage or defeat him.

Thank You, Lord, that You help me to love others. I proclaim that I consider how to provoke others to love and good works. I shall consider others. Amen.



December 02, 2019, 06:28:03 AM
Reply #1722
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December 02, Right Fellowship

 https://cdn.subsplash.com/audios/9S2SS4/85db31bf-f9c8-4715-b8d7-2c236e34ec11/audio.mp3

 
Let us consider one another.

There is one seemingly negative consequence of having fellowship with God and our fellow believers: we can no longer have the same sort of fellowship with unbelievers.

    Do not be bound together with unbelievers; for what partnership have righteousness and lawlessness, or what fellowship has light with darkness? Or what harmony has Christ with Belial, or what has a believer in common with an unbeliever? Or what agreement has the temple of God with idols? For we are the temple of the living God.                  (2 Corinthians 6:14–16 NASB)

The separation from unbelievers that Paul was speaking about is not primarily physical. We may find ourselves side-by-side with unbelievers every day—in our homes, in our workplaces, or in other activities of daily life. In such situations, our Christian testimony requires us to be friendly, courteous, and helpful. But we are not free to share with unbelievers that which is morally or spiritually impure or dishonoring to Christ. In this realm, we must follow Paul’s exhortation in 2 Corinthians 6:17: “Do not touch what is unclean.” If we are sensitive to the Holy Spirit, He will always warn us of these defiling contacts and show us how to protect ourselves from them.

However, the surest protection against wrong fellowship is right fellowship. As God’s children, we are heirs to innumerable joys and blessings of which the world knows nothing. In fact, Paul told us that our Father God “has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ” (Ephesians 1:3). As we regularly share these blessings with the rest of God’s family, we are no longer attracted by the tawdry, impure pleasures of a world that is walking in darkness.

Thank You, Lord, that You help me to love others. I proclaim that I have moved out of fellowship with darkness and into fellowship with God’s family, my brothers and sisters in Christ. I shall consider others. Amen.



December 03, 2019, 06:10:55 AM
Reply #1723
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December 03, Success in the Race

 https://cdn.subsplash.com/audios/9S2SS4/d7cb3bee-7434-4a47-8dce-b6e39848252e/audio.mp3

 
Let us run the race with endurance.

The ninth “Let us” step from the book of Hebrews is found in the first verse of chapter 12:

    Therefore, since we have so great a cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us also lay aside every encumbrance, and the sin which so easily entangles us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us.                  (Hebrews 12:1 NASB)

In English translations, there are two “let us” phrases in that one verse, which is a perfectly legitimate translation. But it just so happens that, in the original Greek, the first phrase, “let us…lay aside every encumbrance,” is not found in that form. Instead, it is a participle that reads like this: “Laying aside every encumbrance, let us run with endurance the race.” The real “let us” phrase in the above verse, on which we will need to focus, is “Let us run with endurance the race that is set before us.”

Here and elsewhere in the New Testament, the Christian life is compared to a race. This analogy implies a specific course marked out before us in advance. Success in the Christian life consists in completing the course in accordance with the rules of the competition.

In light of the fact that we are confronted with this race that is set before us, we need to see that there are four requirements for successfully completing the race. Each one of these requirements is found in the New Testament: (1) the right mental attitude, (2) self-control, (3) endurance, and (4) having our eyes fixed on Jesus. If we will keep these requirements in mind, we can finish the race and keep the faith.

Thank You, Lord, for helping me to “press on.” I proclaim that I am maintaining the right mental attitude, practicing self-control, exhibiting endurance, and keeping my eyes on Jesus. By doing these things, I will finish the race and keep the faith. I shall run the race with endurance. Amen.



December 04, 2019, 05:15:53 AM
Reply #1724
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December 04, The Right Mental Attitude

 https://cdn.subsplash.com/audios/9S2SS4/e252532c-a53b-4008-a1fd-63a986517573/audio.mp3

 
Let us run the race with endurance.

One essential requirement for running a successful race is having a right mental attitude. This truth was exemplified by the words of Paul as he spoke about his relationship to Jesus Christ: “That I may know Him, and the power of His resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death; in order that I may attain to the resurrection from the dead” (Philippians 3:10–11 NASB).

Paul had a specific objective. He did not run aimlessly. (See 1 Corinthians 9:26.) He had an aim before him. He knew what the goal was, which determined his mental attitude. He continued, “Not that I have already obtained it, or have already become perfect [complete], but I press on in order that I may lay hold of that for which also I was laid hold of by Christ Jesus” (verse 12 NASB). Paul’s vision was that Christ had laid hold of him for a purpose; fulfilling that purpose meant that he would have to relate to this purpose. He had to be determined that the purpose of Christ would become his purpose.

    Brethren, I do not regard myself as having laid hold of it yet; but one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and reaching forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.            (verses 13–14 NASB)

The phrase “I press on” occurs twice, once in verse 12 and once in verse 14. That is the mental attitude we need to share with Paul: “I press on. I have a goal. I have not yet arrived, but I know where I’m headed.” The last time Paul used that phrase, he said, “I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.” There is a reward for those who successfully complete the race. Always keep the goal in mind, for we do not want to lose our God-appointed reward.

Thank You, Lord, for helping me to “press on.” I proclaim that I am maintaining the proper mental attitude—keeping the goal in mind. I shall run the race with endurance. Amen.



December 05, 2019, 06:02:48 AM
Reply #1725
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December 05, The Condition of Self-control

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Let us run the race with endurance.

Another condition for a successful race is self-control, and this condition is illustrated by the words Paul used in 1 Corinthians 9:24–25 to compare living the Christian life to competing in an athletic contest. This is an excellent parallel, and one that is still vivid for us today, because we are so often spectators of athletic contests in person and on television. The same principle still applies.

    Do you not know that those who run in a race all run, but only one receives the prize? Run in such a way that you may win.      (1 Corinthians 9:24 NASB)

That is the objective. Then, Paul went on to state the condition:

    And everyone who competes in the games exercises self-control in all things. They then do it to receive a perishable wreath [the prize], but we an imperishable.  (verse 25 NASB)

If we are going to win the race, if we are going to win the prize, we must meet the condition of self-control. This truth is so obvious when we think in terms of athletics. Every athlete who succeeds as an athlete today has to exercise the most rigorous self-control. He has to go into training—controlling what he eats, how much sleep he gets, and the amount of exercise he has. He also has to control his psychology, building up the right kind of attitude. He cannot afford to give way to negative thoughts. He has to go into the competition with a positive attitude, believing he is going to achieve victory.

All this is equally true for us as Christians in our race. We cannot win the race without self-control.

Thank You, Lord, for helping me to “press on.” I proclaim that I am exercising self-control in all things in order to win the prize. I shall run the race with endurance. Amen.



December 06, 2019, 06:46:18 AM
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December 06, Cultivating Endurance

 
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Let us run the race with endurance.

This confession tells us that another condition for victory in this race is stated in Hebrews 12:1: “endurance.” It is one quality that is essential to our character, as Christians, if we are going to achieve real spiritual success and fulfillment. We must cultivate endurance.

What is the opposite of endurance? I think it is giving up, or quitting. Christians cannot afford to be quitters. When God commits us to something, we have to set our faces to fulfill it and go through with it. There is a close relationship between self-control and endurance. Without self-control, we will not achieve endurance. We must master our weaknesses; otherwise, every time we are tested in the area of endurance, some weakness—whether it is emotional, psychological, or physical—will get us down, and we will give up at the very point where we should have been holding on and enduring.

Yet another condition for a successful race is to have our eyes fixed on Jesus. As is stated in Hebrews, “Fixing our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of faith, who for the joy set before Him endured the cross” (Hebrews 12:2 NASB).

We have to look continually to Jesus. In other words, we cannot run the race in self-reliance. Looking to Jesus means that He is our example, and we put our confidence in Him. He is the author—the beginning of our faith. He is the perfecter—the One who will bring us through to victory.

Thank You, Lord, for helping me to “press on.” I proclaim that I do not give up, but fix my gaze on Jesus, the One who brings me through to victory. I shall run the race with endurance. Amen.





December 07, 2019, 05:25:27 AM
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December 07, A Long, Deliberate Race

 
https://cdn.subsplash.com/audios/9S2SS4/bc5b2bb4-5215-4b88-9d78-44708cfde756/audio.mp3
 
Let us run the race with endurance.

Where it says in Hebrews 12:1 to “lay aside every weight,” we must think in terms of this race. The runner empties his pockets and wears the lightest, most flexible clothing he can; he does not carry a single unnecessary ounce of weight. Some things that aren’t exactly sins still act as weights that can burden us and hold us back. They exhaust our strength or lure us into spending too much time and attention on them.

Remember, this is not a short sprint—it is a long, deliberate race. The primary characteristic that is required is endurance. Many people start off the Christian life as if it were a dash. A little while later, they are panting beside the track; they are finished, and they have hardly begun the race. Ecclesiastes 9:11 wisely points out, “The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong.”

The following is the testimony of a victor—the apostle Paul:

I have fought the good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept the faith; in the future there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will award to me on that day; and not only to me, but also to all who have loved His appearing.          (2 Timothy 4:7–8 NASB)

Paul knew that he had won the race. He had finished the course, and he knew that the prize was waiting for him. That is a glorious testimony. It can be the testimony of you and me, too, if we will only meet the conditions.

It isn’t speed or strength but endurance that counts.

Thank You, Lord, for helping me to “press on.” I proclaim that I “lay aside every weight” in preparation to finish a long, deliberate race. I shall run the race with endurance. Amen.



December 08, 2019, 04:29:55 AM
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December 08, The Persevering Process

 https://cdn.subsplash.com/audios/9S2SS4/d03061d9-eb71-42d4-8d40-b976f24355f5/audio.mp3

 
Let us run the race with endurance.

Let’s consider some simple principles that will help us to cultivate endurance, reading first what Paul wrote in Romans 5:1–2: “Therefore, having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom also we have access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.” We rejoice because of what the future holds for us. Paul went on to say that we rejoice not only in the light of the future, but also in what the present offers: “And not only in that, but we also glory in tribulations, knowing that tribulation produces perseverance; and perseverance, character; and character, hope” (verses 3–4). Where verse 3 uses the word “glory,” the original Greek word means “to rejoice, boast, or exult.” We should exult in tribulation because of what tribulation does. The New American Standard Bible says, “Tribulation brings about perseverance; and perseverance, proven character; and proven character, hope.” Perseverance produces proven character in us. This is the heart of endurance—character that has stood the test. As Paul wrote, “Now hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out in our hearts by the Holy Spirit who was given to us” (Romans 5:5).

Love is a matter of character. In essence, we are dealing with the formation of our characters. We rejoice in tribulation, for tribulation is the only thing that produces perseverance. And perseverance produces proven character. I know men with whom I have walked and shared hardship, opposition, misrepresentation, and misunderstanding. But today, for me, their character is proven; I know I can trust them. In the midst of treachery and lawlessness, I want to know whom I can trust.

Thank You, Lord, for helping me to “press on.” I proclaim that I rejoice in the tribulations that produce the character and hope I need to finish the race. I shall run the race with endurance. Amen.


December 09, 2019, 06:25:44 AM
Reply #1729
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December 09, Until the End

 
https://cdn.subsplash.com/audios/9S2SS4/ba88b98a-87d8-41c0-84df-bb60ee859eb4/audio.mp3
 
Let us run the race with endurance.

One of the consistent themes of Hebrews is the danger of going back on your profession of faith in Christ. There are five distinct passages in Hebrews that warn us of the danger of going back. These are some of the most solemn words in Scripture. Therefore, one of the key words that Hebrews emphasizes is this word that we are looking at: endurance.

    And we desire that each one of you show the same diligence to the full assurance of hope until the end, that you do not become sluggish, but imitate those who through faith and patience [endurance] inherit the promises.         (Hebrews 6:11–12)

Faith and endurance. Some people will tell you that faith is all you need to claim God’s promise. But that is not true. You need faith and endurance. It takes both. As the author of Hebrews continued,   “Therefore do not cast away your confidence, which has great reward. For you have need of endurance, so that after you have done the will of God, you may receive the promise” (Hebrews 10:35–36).

The word confidence means that you have freedom of speech. You can talk boldly about Jesus—about what He has done for you and what He is will do for you. You have done the will of God, but you have not yet received the promises. What do you need? Endurance. You need to hold out from the point where you did God’s will and claimed the promise to the point where you actually receive the promise. Some people do the will of God and claim the promise, but they don’t hold out. Then, they say that it didn’t work. But it will not work without endurance. You need faith and endurance.

Thank You, Lord, for helping me to “press on.” I proclaim that I endure to the end by faith, holding out to do God’s will and claiming the promises. I shall run the race with endurance. Amen.



 


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