Author Topic: Derek Prince Ministry  (Read 30077 times)

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December 15, 2014, 05:06:18 AM
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December 15 - Giving Thanks to God
To be thankful is a direct command of Scripture; if we are not thankful, we are being disobedient. (See 1 Thessalonians 5:18.) Thankfulness, like most important attitudes of the Christian life, originates in the will, not in the emotions. We do not have to feel thankful in order to be thankful. Those who have children train them to say “thank you.” In Britain, children are expected to say “thank you” even before they receive anything. It is simply a matter of proper conduct.
 
God often deals with us in that way, requiring us to say “thank you” before we actually receive something. Oftentimes, if we wait to receive it first, we will not get it.
 
And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to which also you were called in one body; and be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord. And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.   (Colossians 3:15–17)
 
This passage makes two demands of us: to do all things in the name of the Lord Jesus, and to give thanks while doing them. These instructions apply to every task, whether it’s scrubbing the kitchen floor, cleaning the bathroom, driving the car, or writing a letter.
 
That gives us a pretty good gauge of right and wrong. If there is anything that we cannot honestly do in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks all the while, then we’d better not do it. This method cuts away a whole list of do’s and don’ts. It is a basic principle to guide our words and actions.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, for all You have done for me. I proclaim that I will do all things in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father while I am doing them. I shall show gratitude. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Thankfulness
December 16, 2014, 05:00:54 AM
Reply #21
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December 16 - Fulfilling God’s Will
Thankfulness is a way of expressing the peace of Christ that rules in our hearts, an expression of the Word of Christ dwelling richly within us. Giving thanks is a principle that should guide all that we do. (See Colossians 3:15–17.) Let’s look at three short but no less important verses, starting with 1 Thessalonians 5:16–18: “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, in everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” There are three simple instructions in those verses: rejoice always, pray without ceasing, and in everything give thanks. Concerning the giving thanks in everything, Paul said, “This is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.” When we are not giving thanks, we are not fulfilling the will of God. In other words, we are out of God’s will. How important it is to understand that!
 
The second thing I want to say about thankfulness, or thanksgiving, is that it is an essential expression of the fullness of the Spirit. Paul wrote, “Do not quench the Spirit” (verse 19). Here is what he said to the Ephesians: “So then do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is. And do not get drunk with wine, for that is dissipation, but be filled with the [Holy] Spirit” (Ephesians 5:17–18 NASB).
 
Paul provided us with a negative, followed by a positive, regarding the will of the Lord. If we do not understand these truths about God’s will, then we are foolish. Each exhortation is equally valid. It is wrong for a Christian to get drunk with wine, but it is equally wrong for a Christian not to be filled with the Holy Spirit. Sometimes, as religious people, we focus so much on the negative - not filling our-selves with wine so that we become drunk - that we forget about the positive - being filled with the Holy Spirit. We need to be filled with the Spirit.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, for all You have done for me. I proclaim that by giving thanks, I am fulfilling the will of God and expressing the fullness of the Spirit. I shall show gratitude. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Thanksgiving
December 17, 2014, 05:14:52 AM
Reply #22
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December 17 - Bearing His Reproach
The eleventh “Let us” resolution of Hebrews is in chapter 13:
 
Therefore Jesus also, that He might sanctify the people through His own blood, suffered outside the gate. Hence, let us go out to Him outside the camp, bearing His reproach. For here we do not have a lasting city, but we are seeking the city which is to come.   (Hebrews 13:12–14 NASB)
 
This passage deals with our attitude and relationship to this present world. It is telling us that our home is not in this world. We have no enduring place in this world. The world rejected Jesus. It drove Him out of the city and crucified Him outside the gate.
 
The Scripture always emphasizes the fact that Jesus’ crucifixion took place outside the city wall. Jesus was rejected. He was put out of society; the world did not want Him. And the way in which the world treated Jesus, sooner or later, and in one way or another, is going to be the way in which the world will treat you and me, as believers. We must be willing to go out to Him - to the place of crucifixion, rejection, and shame - bearing His reproach. Elsewhere in Hebrews, it says that the reproach of Christ amounts to greater riches than all the treasures of Egypt. (See Hebrews 11:26.) So, His reproach becomes our glory.
 
Then, the writer gave a beautiful reason: “For here we do not have a lasting city.” Other people may think that this world is permanent, but we know that it is not. “But we are seeking the city which is to come.” I like this translation because it says the city. There is one specific city that is the destination and the home of all true believers. It is where we really belong.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, that You are calling me to leave this world behind. I proclaim that I am willing to go out to Jesus “outside the city wall,” bearing His reproach. I shall go forth to Him outside the camp. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Twelve Steps to a Good Year, Part 3
December 18, 2014, 05:26:14 AM
Reply #23
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December 18 - A City He Has Prepared
In the eleventh chapter of Hebrews, the writer listed a kind of honor roll of many faithful saints of the Old Testament. Then, he said,
 
All these died in faith, without receiving the promises, but having seen them and having welcomed them from a distance, and having confessed that they were strangers and exiles on the earth. For those who say such things make it clear that they are seeking a country of their own. And indeed if they had been thinking of that country from which they went out, they would have had opportunity to return. But as it is, they desire a better country, that is a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God; for He has prepared a city for them.   (Hebrews 11:13–16 NASB)
 
These forerunners in the faith - men and women who are our examples in so many ways - confessed that they were strangers and exiles on this earth. They did not really belong; they were seeking a country of their own.
 
There are multitudes of refugees in our world today who are going through the agony of having no permanent place of their own. The people in Hebrews, too, were seeking a place of their own - but not in this world. If they had wanted to, they could have gone back to the place from which they came. Abraham, for instance, could have returned to Ur of the Chaldeans. But he had his mind set forward; he was not looking backward. They desired a better country - that is, a heavenly one. Then, we read that beautiful sentence, “Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God.” When we identify ourselves with God - with His preparation of a city for us - then He is proud to be our God. He has prepared a city - for them, for us.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, that You are calling me to leave this world behind. I proclaim that I am a stranger and an exile on this earth, seeking the city that God has prepared for me. I shall go forth to Him outside the camp. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Twelve Steps to a Good Year, Part 3
December 19, 2014, 05:04:08 AM
Reply #24
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December 19 - Identification with the Cross
Commitment to Jesus requires identification with His cross and going out to the place where He was crucified. This commitment rules out two things: pleasing self and pleasing the world.
 
Brethren, join in following my example, and observe those who walk according to the pattern you have in us. For many walk, of whom I often told you, and now tell you even weeping, that they are enemies of the cross of Christ, whose end is destruction, whose god is their appetite, and whose glory is in their shame, who set their minds on earthly things. (Philippians 3:17–19 NASB)
 
Paul was speaking of people who merely profess to be Christians, enemies of the cross who claim to be followers of Christ. They indulge themselves and set their minds on the things of this world. The principle of the cross - death to self and to the things of the flesh - has not been applied in their lives. Even in the church, many people profess allegiance to Christ but reject His cross. Their end is destruction.
 
By our identification with the cross of Jesus, we also rule out pleasing this world. James wrote these stern words to professing believers: “You adulterous people, don’t you know that friendship with the world is hatred toward God? Anyone who chooses to be a friend of the world becomes an enemy of God” (James 4:4 NIV). James called these people “adulterous.” Becoming part of the bride of Christ, the church, requires a spiritual commitment - the bride must be single-hearted, totally committed and devoted to Jesus. If that devotion to Jesus is infiltrated by the love of this world, then we are spiritual adulterers. We are not being faithful to the Bridegroom, Jesus Christ. To be a friend of the world is to commit spiritual adultery.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, that You are calling me to leave this world behind. I proclaim that I apply this principle of the cross—death to self and to the things of the flesh. I shall go forth to Him outside the camp. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Twelve Steps to a Good Year, Part 3
December 20, 2014, 04:58:50 AM
Reply #25
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December 20 - The Mark of Separation
In the gospel of John, Jesus issued this statement:
 
If the world hates you, keep in mind that it hated me first. If you belonged to the world, it would love you as its own. As it is, you do not belong to the world, but I have chosen you out of the world. That is why the world hates you.   (John 15:18–19 NIV)
 
When the world “loves us as its own,” that is a pretty sure sign that we do not belong to Jesus. We need to give heed to that warning. What, then, should our attitude be in light of this? Paul expressed it well in Galatians 6:14: “But may it never be that I should boast, except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world” (NASB).
 
May we never boast or put confidence in anything but the cross of the Lord. Not in education, religion, or denomination - none of these things. We can safely boast only in the cross of the Lord Jesus Christ, where Jesus won a total, permanent, irreversible victory over all the forces of evil. Through the cross, “the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.” The cross is the mark of separation between the people of God and the world. When we accept the principle of the cross in our lives, we no longer belong to this world. Jesus gave us this beautiful promise of victory: “I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world” (John 16:33 NIV).
 
We are going to have trouble - but Jesus has overcome the world! Through Him, we, too, can overcome the world, if we are willing to go forth to Him - outside the camp, bearing His reproach.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, that You are calling me to leave this world behind. I proclaim that I accept the cross as a mark of separation between the people of God and the world - a world to which I no longer belong. I shall go forth to Him outside the camp. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Twelve Steps to a Good Year, Part 3
December 21, 2014, 05:06:21 AM
Reply #26
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December 21 - His Banishment: Our Acceptance
In the sixteenth chapter of Leviticus, we read about the Day of Atonement, specifically about the scapegoat. This day involved two goats. One goat was a sin offering, and it was killed. The other goat, which was called azazel, or “scapegoat” (Leviticus 16:8), was led away into the wilderness. It was led off into an uninhabited land to wander there hopelessly and die of thirst. It never returned.
 
Jesus was the scapegoat in the figure of the Day of Atonement. He was banished from the presence of Almighty God. Jesus is actually typified by both goats. As the sin offering, He died on the cross. But as the scapegoat, He was banished from the presence of God, enduring our rejection for us. The opposite of banishment is acceptance. That is stated in Ephesians 1:6: “He made us accepted in the Beloved.”
 
We must all understand that we are accepted. Again, one of the most common problems that people have in modern America is the feeling of rejection. In any given congregation, I can guarantee that there are several people who are struggling with feelings of rejection. In most cases, these feelings are due to their parents - growing up, they may have never believed that their parents really wanted them, and so they never learned to feel accepted. They go through life feeling rejected, unhappy, unable to integrate with other people, and unable to show love, because they have never experienced love.
 
 I have learned by experience that one of the great keys to helping such people is to impart to them the assurance that they are accepted by God. It is also comforting to know that He Himself knows the pain of rejection, for no one else was as utterly rejected as He when He died on the cross for our sins.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, that You are calling me to leave this world behind. I proclaim that because Jesus was banished from the presence of Almighty God, I am “accepted in the beloved.” I shall go forth to Him outside the camp. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Complete Salvation and How to Receive It, Part 2
December 22, 2014, 04:55:27 AM
Reply #27
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December 22 - Accepting “the Arm of the Lord”
Isaiah 53 begins with a warning about the danger that this prophetic message, given to Isaiah by God, will be met by many with unbelief: “Who has believed our report? And to whom has the arm of the LORD been revealed?” (Isaiah 53:1).
 
The Lord’s Servant, described in earlier verses (see Isaiah 52:13–15) and foretold in this prophecy, is described in the above verse as “the arm of the LORD.” This phrase denotes God’s power intervening on behalf of His people. It indicated ahead of time that through Jesus Christ Himself, God would intervene to bring salvation to His people. All this was fulfilled in Jesus. He came to reveal God and to bring His salvation and healing to everyone. Peter, an eyewitness of the earthly ministry of Jesus, summed it up: “God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power, who went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with Him” (Acts 10:38).
 
The gospel of John applies Isaiah’s prophecy directly to Jesus:
 
But although He had done so many signs [miracles] before them, they did not believe in Him, that the word of Isaiah the prophet might be fulfilled, which he spoke: “Lord, who has believed our report? And to whom has the arm of the LORD been revealed?”   (John 12:37–38)
 
We must hold fast to our belief in Him who fulfilled the Old Testament prophecies. Even many of those who witnessed firsthand the miracles of Jesus were incredulous. Let us not demand signs and wonders, which do not guarantee belief, but let us maintain faith in the One who earned our salvation, the greatest miracle of all.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, that You are calling me to leave this world behind. I proclaim that although many of Jesus’ own people rejected Him, I receive Him as “the arm of the Lord” who brings salvation. I shall go forth to Him outside the camp. Amen.

This teaching was taken from the book: Three Messages for Israel
December 23, 2014, 05:06:50 AM
Reply #28
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December 23 - “No Form Nor Comeliness”
Isaiah 53:2 gives a prophetic description of Jesus’ early years on earth: “For He shall grow up before Him as a tender plant, and as a root out of dry ground. He has no form or comeliness; and when we see Him, there is no beauty that we should desire Him.” From youth to adulthood, Jesus grew up like a sturdy plant, upright and God-fearing in all His ways. This fact is also described in Luke 2:40: “And the Child grew and became strong in spirit, filled with wisdom; and the grace of God was upon Him.” At the same time, Jesus was “a root out of dry ground.” He came forth as God’s messenger to Israel at a period of prolonged spiritual poverty. Israel had not received any prophetic revelation for nearly three hundred years. This prophetic silence was broken only by John the Baptist, then Jesus Himself, who both proclaimed the coming of God’s kingdom.
 
Jesus had no special outward splendor that would reveal His true identity to people. They saw in Him nothing more than the son of Joseph the carpenter. (See Matthew 13:54–55.) When Peter acknowledged Him as the Messiah and Son of God, Jesus said that this revelation came not through Peter’s natural senses; rather, it was given to him by God the Father. (See Matthew 16:17.) The prophecy continues, “He is despised and rejected by men, a Man of sorrows [pains] and acquainted with grief [disease]. And we hid, as it were, our faces from Him; He was despised, and we did not esteem Him” (Isaiah 53:3). Jesus did not seek the favor of the wealthy. Instead, He devoted Himself tirelessly to helping the poor and the suffering. He faced pain and disease, eventually taking upon Himself the pain and disease of the whole human race. Hanging on the cross in shame and agony, He became “like one from whom men hide their face” (Isaiah 53:3 NASB).

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord, that You are calling me to leave this world behind. I proclaim that although Jesus was despised and rejected by men, I receive Him and esteem Him as Messiah, the Son of God. I shall go forth to Him outside the camp. Amen.

This teaching was taken from the book: Three Messages for Israel
December 24, 2014, 05:36:05 AM
Reply #29
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December 24 - Lips That Give Thanks
This is the twelfth and final “Let us” resolution from the book of Hebrews: “Through Him [Jesus] then, let us continually offer up a sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of lips that give thanks to His name” (Hebrews 13:15 NASB). To me, this resolution is very appropriate and beautiful because it is something we are instructed to keep on doing. If we continually offer up a sacrifice of praise to God, all year long, it will make all the difference as to what the year holds for each of us.
 
This final step of offering up a sacrifice of praise to God relates directly, and in a practical way, to the two previous steps, which were, “Let us show gratitude” and “Let us go forth to Him outside the gate.”
 
Gratitude naturally leads to praise. There are many passages in the Bible in which thanksgiving is related to praise. One of the most beautiful is Psalm 100:4: “Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into His courts with praise.” The first step in gaining access to God is thanksgiving; the second step is praise. Thanksgiving leads to praise. It finds expression in praise, and it flows out in praise.
 
The step just before this one, “Let us go forth to Him outside the camp,” brings us release from the two slaveries of pleasing self and pleasing the world. Again, this step is directly related to offering the sacrifice of praise. You might not see it at first, but there are two hindrances to spontaneous, free-flowing praise in our lives: love of self and love of the world. As long as our affections are centered in ourselves or in the world, we are not really free to praise God. The cross removes these two hindrances and sets us free to praise God.

prayerresponse
Thank You, Lord. I give You praise. I proclaim that I remove all hindrances and that I offer up praise to God—“the fruit of lips that give thanks to His name.” I shall continually offer up a sacrifice of praise. Amen.

This teaching was taken from audio message: Twelve Steps to a Good Year, Part 3
 


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